Uncovering Philly law enforcement's secret bank accounts

BY RYAN BRIGGS AND MAX MARIN – CITY & STATE

On a chilly night in 2014, Nassir Geiger left his house an innocent man with a 2000 Buick LeSabre and $580 cash in his pocket – his paycheck for the week. He drove to a nearby McDonald’s for a late-night snack. By the time he returned home the next morning, Philadelphia police would take all that away.

“I was scared,” Geiger recalled. “I had never been to jail before.”

Geiger’s only “crime” had been seeing a familiar face in the Northeast Philly McDonald’s parking lot. As he paused to say hello to a coworker from the city’s Streets Department, he drew the attention of undercover narcotics police. Two plainclothes officers, suspecting the harmless interaction had been a drug deal, followed Geiger on his way home. Brandishing their firearms, they charged his car. After the stop, Geiger watched helplessly as one officer confiscated his wages, while another hopped into his Buick and sped away. 

Full article at CITY & STATE

DA candidate endorses safe injection sites for heroin

THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

Democrat Larry Krasner, the front-runner to become Philadelphia’s next district attorney, says he supports city-sanctioned spaces where people addicted to heroin can inject drugs under medical supervision and access treatment, a move advocates see as a promising step toward making the city the first in the U.S. to open such a site.

His Republican opponent, Beth Grossman, says she’s open to discussions on the matter.

For those on the front lines of the heroin crisis in Philadelphia, both are encouraging stances in a political arena where the idea can still be dismissed out of hand. But recently, cities across the country have begun to consider the possibility of instituting supervised injection sites; several nations, including Canada, have used the approach for years.

Supervised Injection Facilities: It’s Time

The opioid crisis is ravaging our city. Every week, even every day, brings new stories about how this epidemic is destroying not only people who are addicted, but also their families and communities. Children in hard-hit Philadelphia neighborhoods have to step over dirty needles in parks and playgrounds. Last year, we saw 900 overdose deaths, and but for the heroic efforts of our first responders — as well as librarians, outreach workers, and other drug users — there would have been many more.

The opioid crisis is an urgent matter of public health that has direct impact on public safety. It is fundamentally immoral to stand by while needles are shared and lives are lost when that is preventable. As District Attorney, I will use discretion in charging, I will use the bully pulpit to reduce harm and save lives, and I will support properly run and appropriately located supervised injection facilities.

How Philly plans to ditch cash bail and what stands in the way

BILLYPENN

Democratic candidate for district attorney Larry Krasner has a plan to get rid of cash bail. He’s not the only game in town.

Krasner, the Democratic nominee for Philadelphia district attorney and the favorite to win the November general election, branded himself as the outsider candidate — the criminal defense attorney who was going to come in as the city’s top prosecutor and turn the Office of the District Attorney upside down. In a field of seven candidates, Krasner won the primary and topped the second-place finisher by 18 points on a wave of progressive support, largely through vowing to never seek the death penalty, to address systematic mass incarceration and, yes, to reform the city’s cash bail system

Larry Krasner volvió a prender los motores de su campaña a la Fiscalía

POR EDWIN LÓPEZ MOYA – AL DÍA

El candidato demócrata a "District Attorney" de Filadelfia prometió que, de resultar elegido, usará todos los recursos a su alcance para oponerse a las políticas de Donald Trump.

“Este es un momento político clave. Cuando nos reunimos en febrero, sabíamos que teníamos un presidente peligroso, pero no nos imaginamos qué tan peligroso podía llegar a ser. Ahora tenemos claro que el Partido Republicano y su presidente están a favor del autoritarismo y en contra de la Constitución, del ordenamiento jurisdiccional, y de un modelo de justicia ecuánime y equitativa”.

Con este mensaje, Larry Krasner, el candidato oficial por el Partido Demócrata para la Fiscalía Distrital de Filadelfia, lanzó la noche de este miércoles la segunda fase de su campaña. 

... En declaraciones para AL DÍA, Krasner habló sobre la importancia del voto latino en su campaña. Recordó que es el único candidato que habla español y que su trayectoria de más de 25 años, en la que el 40 por ciento de sus clientes fueron hispanohablantes, le ha servido para conocer muy de cerca las necesidades de la comunidad latina de la ciudad. 

Artículo entero en AL DÍA

A Recognition That We’re All Getting Screwed

n+1 MAGAZINE

It’s 12 degrees with the wind chill on this mid-March Saturday morning, and I keep switching my clipboard from one hand to another so each gloved hand can take a turn regaining circulation in my pocket. Nobody answers at the first few doors I knock, and I don’t blame them for not wanting to let the cold in. Even if someone answers, I wonder if I’ll be able to persuade anyone here to vote for Larry Krasner, the most progressive candidate for district attorney that Philadelphia—perhaps any major city—has ever seen.

Progressives, work for both economic fairness and racial justice

OPINION — THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER

There’s an old labor movement saying: “The boss is the best organizer.” Nothing mobilizes people like having a threatening adversary, and so Trump is unquestionably the best organizer. He has animated an incredible surge in civic resistance and protest that is as inspiring as anything we’ve seen since the civil rights movement. 

... The candidates who are pointing a way forward are those who can talk race and class at the same time. Larry Krasner, who we believe will be Philadelphia’s next district attorney, speaks forcefully about the roles biased policing and poverty play in exacerbating mass incarceration.

Larry Krasner speaks out on Charlottesville

"You are having a beautiful gathering here, for all kinds of people. But there's something different that's happening in Charlottesville, Virginia today ... there's a whole bunch of people marching down there with torches, and there's whole bunch of people marching with signs that say 'white supremacy,' with pro Ku Klux Klan signs, with signs that express their hatred for people who are different than them — black people, Jewish people, people from other countries.

"And it got even uglier today. Because people who care about this issue went up against them, protested against them, and one of them is now dead, and 19 of them are now severely injured, because someone took a gray Dodge Charger and drove it at 40 miles an hour into that crowd. 
Free speech is not enough for that kind of person, what they want is violence and what they want is death. They want what they have always wanted — and most importantly, make no mistake, along with their torches, along with their signs expressing their hatred, they were carrying signs that said 'Donald Trump.'

"When Donald Trump was asked what he thought about this today, he said he was worried about the hatred on all sides. Well I don't know what other sides he's talking about. You got one side that runs people over in cars, that carries torches, that advocates the death of people that look different than them, and then you've got some people who are opposed to that. Being opposed to that is not hate. That is love. And that's what I see when I look out at you."

— At the 5th Annual Soul School Festival, hosted by State Rep. Jordan Harris.